Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Chimpanzees Released After 30 Years Of Testing, Brace Yourself For Smiles

A VERY HEARTWARMING MOVING VIDEO...smiling and crying...TSS



Chimpanzees Released After 30 Years Of Testing. Brace Yourself For Smiles.



 




i remember the late great Dr. Gibbs at NIH whom studied transmissible spongiform encephalopathy prion disease his whole life, and was a great scientist, i remember him saying how bad he hated using chimps for research. he grew very close to the chimps, and it disturbed him greatly. i always thought we should use humans instead of chimps. i.e. death row inmates. expose them, study them, compensate their families. this would indeed put to end the controversy and excuse of 'oh, chimps are not humans, study does not hold water' type mentality. of course it would be a voluntary program.













A scientist’s change of heart Years later when author Richard Rhodes interviewed Clarence J. Gibbs for his 1997 book on the history of spongiform encephalopathies, he reports that Gibbs expressed distress over infecting chimpanzees with deadly diseases: “Joe Gibbs came to hate using chimpanzees for medical experiments. The bright, engaging primates were too human. Gibbs [purportedly] gave up inoculating chimpanzees with lethal diseases years ago—‘I just couldn’t do it anymore,’ he says today.” (13)







why do we not want to do TSE transmission studies on chimpanzees $



snip...


5. A positive result from a chimpanzee challenged severly would likely create alarm in some circles even if the result could not be interpreted for man. I have a view that all these agents could be transmitted provided a large enough dose by appropriate routes was given and the animals kept long enough. Until the mechanisms of the species barrier are more clearly understood it might be best to retain that hypothesis.


snip...


R. BRADLEY







Wednesday, February 16, 2011


IN CONFIDENCE SCRAPIE TRANSMISSION TO CHIMPANZEES


IN CONFIDENCE


reference...


RB3.20


TRANSMISSION TO CHIMPANZEES





 

Subject: Re: Hello Dr. Gibbs...........


Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 14:14:18 –0500


From: "Clarence J. Gibbs, Jr., Ph.D."


To: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."





Hi Terry:


xxx E Stret N.E., Washington, D. C. 20002.

 

Better shrimp and oysters than cards!!!!

 

Have a happy holiday and thanks for all the information you bring to the screen.



Joe Gibbs



==========



Tuesday, August 18, 2009


BSE-The Untold Story - joe gibbs and singeltary 1999 – 2009




 

Thursday, February 14, 2013



The Many Faces of Mad Cow Disease Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy BSE and TSE prion disease







Friday, February 11, 2011


Atypical/Nor98 Scrapie Infectivity in Sheep Peripheral Tissues



 


Monday, April 22, 2013


North Carolina Senate bill S.B. 648 could be health risk and risk your children again to mad cow type disease BSE TSE prion disease


Letter: Senate bill could be health risk




 

Thursday, February 21, 2013


National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center Cases Examined January 16, 2013





16 YEAR OLD SPORADIC FFI ?


Monday, January 14, 2013


Gambetti et al USA Prion Unit change another highly suspect USA mad cow victim to another fake name i.e. sporadic FFI at age 16 CJD Foundation goes along with this BSe





Monday, December 31, 2012


Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease and Human TSE Prion Disease in Washington State, 2006–2011-2012




 

Tuesday, December 25, 2012


CREUTZFELDT JAKOB TSE PRION DISEASE HUMANS END OF YEAR REVIEW DECEMBER 25, 2012





Tuesday, June 26, 2012


Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease Human TSE report update North America, Canada, Mexico, and USDA PRION UNIT as of May 18, 2012


type determination pending Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (tdpCJD), is on the rise in Canada and the USA





Wednesday, June 13, 2012


MEXICO IS UNDER or MIS DIAGNOSING CREUTZFELDT JAKOB DISEASE AND OTHER PRION DISEASE SOME WITH POSSIBLE nvCJD





*** The discovery of previously unrecognized prion diseases in both humans and animals (i.e., Nor98 in small ruminants) demonstrates that the range of prion diseases might be wider than expected and raises crucial questions about the epidemiology and strain properties of these new forms. We are investigating this latter issue by molecular and biological comparison of VPSPr, GSS and Nor98.

 
 

VARIABLY PROTEASE-SENSITVE PRIONOPATHY IS TRANSMISSIBLE ...price of prion poker goes up again $


OR-10: Variably protease-sensitive prionopathy is transmissible in bank voles


Romolo Nonno,1 Michele Di Bari,1 Laura Pirisinu,1 Claudia D’Agostino,1 Stefano Marcon,1 Geraldina Riccardi,1 Gabriele Vaccari,1 Piero Parchi,2 Wenquan Zou,3 Pierluigi Gambetti,3 Umberto Agrimi1 1Istituto Superiore di Sanit√†; Rome, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Scienze Neurologiche, Universit√† di Bologna; Bologna, Italy; 3Case Western Reserve University; Cleveland, OH USA


Background. Variably protease-sensitive prionopathy (VPSPr) is a recently described “sporadic”neurodegenerative disease involving prion protein aggregation, which has clinical similarities with non-Alzheimer dementias, such as fronto-temporal dementia. Currently, 30 cases of VPSPr have been reported in Europe and USA, of which 19 cases were homozygous for valine at codon 129 of the prion protein (VV), 8 were MV and 3 were MM. A distinctive feature of VPSPr is the electrophoretic pattern of PrPSc after digestion with proteinase K (PK). After PK-treatment, PrP from VPSPr forms a ladder-like electrophoretic pattern similar to that described in GSS cases. The clinical and pathological features of VPSPr raised the question of the correct classification of VPSPr among prion diseases or other forms of neurodegenerative disorders. Here we report preliminary data on the transmissibility and pathological features of VPSPr cases in bank voles.


Materials and Methods. Seven VPSPr cases were inoculated in two genetic lines of bank voles, carrying either methionine or isoleucine at codon 109 of the prion protein (named BvM109 and BvI109, respectively). Among the VPSPr cases selected, 2 were VV at PrP codon 129, 3 were MV and 2 were MM. Clinical diagnosis in voles was confirmed by brain pathological assessment and western blot for PK-resistant PrPSc (PrPres) with mAbs SAF32, SAF84, 12B2 and 9A2.


Results. To date, 2 VPSPr cases (1 MV and 1 MM) gave positive transmission in BvM109. Overall, 3 voles were positive with survival time between 290 and 588 d post inoculation (d.p.i.). All positive voles accumulated PrPres in the form of the typical PrP27–30, which was indistinguishable to that previously observed in BvM109 inoculated with sCJDMM1 cases.


In BvI109, 3 VPSPr cases (2 VV and 1 MM) showed positive transmission until now. Overall, 5 voles were positive with survival time between 281 and 596 d.p.i.. In contrast to what observed in BvM109, all BvI109 showed a GSS-like PrPSc electrophoretic pattern, characterized by low molecular weight PrPres. These PrPres fragments were positive with mAb 9A2 and 12B2, while being negative with SAF32 and SAF84, suggesting that they are cleaved at both the C-terminus and the N-terminus. Second passages are in progress from these first successful transmissions.


Conclusions. Preliminary results from transmission studies in bank voles strongly support the notion that VPSPr is a transmissible prion disease. Interestingly, VPSPr undergoes divergent evolution in the two genetic lines of voles, with sCJD-like features in BvM109 and GSS-like properties in BvI109.


The discovery of previously unrecognized prion diseases in both humans and animals (i.e., Nor98 in small ruminants) demonstrates that the range of prion diseases might be wider than expected and raises crucial questions about the epidemiology and strain properties of these new forms. We are investigating this latter issue by molecular and biological comparison of VPSPr, GSS and Nor98.





Wednesday, March 28, 2012


VARIABLY PROTEASE-SENSITVE PRIONOPATHY IS TRANSMISSIBLE, price of prion poker goes up again $



 

Thursday, April 4, 2013


Variably protease-sensitive prionopathy in the UK: a retrospective review 1991–2008


Brain (2013) 136 (4): 1102-1115. doi: 10.1093/brain/aws366





Sunday, March 31, 2013


Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease CJD worlds youngest documented victim, 11 years old, shall we pray





Wednesday, April 24, 2013


Dissociation between Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE) Infectivity and Proteinase K-Resistant PrPSc Levels in Peripheral Tissue from a Murine Transgenic Model of TSE Disease



 
 
Saturday, December 13, 2014

*** Terry S. Singeltary Sr. Publications TSE prion disease Peer Review ***

Diagnosis and Reporting of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Singeltary, Sr et al. JAMA.2001; 285: 733-734. Vol. 285 No. 6, February 14, 2001 JAMA

snip...

http://transmissiblespongiformencephalopathy.blogspot.com/2014/12/terry-s-singeltary-sr-publications-tse.html




TSS


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