Monday, January 4, 2016

Long live the OIE, or time to close the doors on a failed entity?

Long live the OIE, or time to close the doors on a failed entity?
 
Long live the OIE
 
By Dr. Bernard Vallat, OIE Director General December 29, 2015 | 10:08 am EST
 
 
the OIE BSE TSE Prion policy now, the BSE MRR, legalized the free trading of the TSE Prion disease, humans and animals have now become expendable. ...
 
‘’AS i said before, OIE should hang up there jock strap now, since it appears they will buckle every time a country makes some political hay about trade protocol, commodities and futures. IF they are not going to be science based, they should do everyone a favor and dissolve there organization.’’
 
IN A NUT SHELL ;
 
(Adopted by the International Committee of the OIE on 23 May 2006)
 
11. Information published by the OIE is derived from appropriate declarations made by the official Veterinary Services of Member Countries. The OIE is not responsible for inaccurate publication of country disease status based on inaccurate information or changes in epidemiological status or other significant events that were not promptly reported to the Central Bureau,
 
 
snip...see ;
 
Sunday, October 18, 2015
 
World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the Institut Pasteur Cooperating on animal disease and zoonosis research
 
 
Thursday, December 17, 2015
 
Annual report of the Scientific Network on BSE-TSE 2015 EFSA-Q-2015-00738 10 December 2015
 
 
Saturday, December 12, 2015
 
*** BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY BSE TSE PRION REPORT DECEMBER 14, 2015
 
 
Friday, January 1, 2016
 
South Korea Lifts Ban on Beef, Veal Imports From Canada
 
 
US CONGRESS, another failed entity...tss
 
Tuesday, December 29, 2015
 
*** Congress repeals country-of-origin labeling rule for beef and pork
 
 
December 28, 2015 at 2:21am
 
*** Australian government assessing risk of importing beef from US, Japan and the Netherlands
 
 
Thursday, December 24, 2015
 
Infectious disease spread is fueled by international trade
 
 
*** you can find some history of the BSE cases in Canada and Klein’s BSE SSS policy comment here ;
 
 
Monday, November 16, 2015
 
*** Docket No. APHIS-2007-0127 Scrapie in Sheep and Goats Terry Singeltary Sr. Submission ***
 
 
Wednesday, December 16, 2015
 
*** Objects in contact with classical scrapie sheep act as a reservoir for scrapie transmission
 
 
Saturday, December 12, 2015
 
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD TSE PRION REPORT DECEMBER 14, 2015
 
 
TEXAS MONTHLY CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD JANUARY 2016 DEER BREEDERS STILL DON'T GET IT $
 
Chronic Wasting Unease
 
The emergence of a deadly disease has wildlife officials and deer breeders eyeing each other suspiciously.
 
 
Subject: Bayesian Modeling of Prion Disease Dynamics in Mule Deer Using Population Monitoring and Capture-Recapture Data
 
To date, we are unaware of a study that documents a decrease in CWD prevalence over time in mule deer, white-tailed deer or elk. We briefly consider three plausible explanations for our findings: a) that natural oscillations occur in CWD outbreaks; b) that the outbreak has peaked and is declining to a lower endemic level; or c) that previous management actions were more successful at suppressing the outbreak than originally believed.
 
Sharp & Pastor [41] illustrated that CWD outbreaks may play out as a series of reoccurring epidemics characterized by either stable limit cycles or oscillations that may dampen or amplify as a function of deer density. If this is the case, we would expect today’s declining deer population to feedback on conditions–lowering transmission rates leading to reduced CWD effects and a growing population. Increasing abundance would support higher transmission rates, deer decline, and oscillations of CWD prevalence and deer. Alternatively, Almberg et al. [21] (see also [22–24,41,42]) suggested that CWD outbreaks could reach endemic equilibrium characterized by coexistence of a smaller deer population and CWD. Under these scenarios, population prevalence would reach a lower, constant level after a period of high prevalence and deer decline.
 
Although neither of the foregoing scenarios can be dismissed completely, invoking them ignores the extensive management of this deer population that occurred in the years between the two time points we chose as the basis for our analyses. Management aimed to reduce CWD transmission between 2000 and 2005, which included a combination of (crude and unpopular) focal culling and a broader increase in female harvest, decreased overall deer abundance by about 25%. Analyses carried out shortly after suggested that reductions in deer density had made little impact on CWD prevalence [10]. However, our current findings suggest that these management actions may indeed have attenuated the outbreak. Observed dynamics over the last decade closely approximate those predicted from models by Wild et al. [42] that included a substantial amount of selective predation on CWD-infected individuals. That harvest could be a source of selective mortality is supported by an early notion that CWD-infected deer might be more vulnerable to harvest [43], just as infected deer also appear to be more vulnerable to vehicle collisions and predation [20,33,44]. This offers the possibility that hunting could be used as a more tightly controlled substitute for predation in studies of system responses with CWD and perhaps other similar diseases.
 
The protracted time-scale of the CWD outbreak is much longer than the timespan of our research, which limits our ability to identify the true explanation of our findings. Nonetheless, our research suggests that, at least for the foreseeable future (e.g., decades), mule deer populations sharing the overall survival and infection probabilities estimated from our analyses may persist but likely will not thrive where CWD becomes established as an endemic infectious disease.
 
 
‘’Nonetheless, our research suggests that, at least for the foreseeable future (e.g., decades), mule deer populations sharing the overall survival and infection probabilities estimated from our analyses may persist but likely will not thrive where CWD becomes established as an endemic infectious disease. ‘’
 
*** Bayesian Modeling of Prion Disease Dynamics in Mule Deer Using Population Monitoring and Capture-Recapture Data
 
‘’Mountain lions prey selectively on CWD infected deer [33] and CWD could result in an abundance of vulnerable prey, thereby enhancing mountain lion survival and reproduction [20].’’
 
please see ;
 
‘’preliminary results suggesting that bobcats (Lynx rufus) may be susceptible to white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) chronic wasting disease agent.’’
 
references on Feline Spongiform Encephalopathy FSE toward the bottom, see ;
 
Assessing Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy Species Barriers with an In Vitro Prion Protein Conversion Assay
 
Friday, January 01, 2016
 
Bayesian Modeling of Prion Disease Dynamics in Mule Deer Using Population Monitoring and Capture-Recapture Data
 
 
Saturday, December 12, 2015
 
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD TSE PRION REPORT DECEMBER 14, 2015
 
 
Wednesday, December 30, 2015
 
Michigan Deer suspected positive for CWD found in Watertown Township; Jan. 12 public meeting set
 
 
TEXAS MONTHLY CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD JANUARY 2016 DEER BREEDERS STILL DON'T GET IT $
 
Chronic Wasting Unease
 
The emergence of a deadly disease has wildlife officials and deer breeders eyeing each other suspiciously.
 
 
Wednesday, December 16, 2015
 
Objects in contact with classical scrapie sheep act as a reservoir for scrapie transmission
 
 
Saturday, December 12, 2015
 
CREUTZFELDT JAKOB DISEASE CJD TSE PRION REPORT DECEMBER 14, 2015
 
 
MOM
 
Thursday, December 24, 2015
 
Revisiting the Heidenhain Variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Evidence for Prion Type Variability Influencing Clinical Course and Laboratory Findings
 
Article type: Research Article
 
 
Evidence for human transmission of amyloid-β pathology and cerebral amyloid angiopathy
 
 
07 02:27 AM
 
Terry S. Singeltary Sr. said:
 
re-Evidence for human transmission of amyloid-? pathology and cerebral amyloid angiopathy
 
Nature 525, 247?250 (10 September 2015) doi:10.1038/nature15369 Received 26 April 2015 Accepted 14 August 2015 Published online 09 September 2015 Updated online 11 September 2015 Erratum (October, 2015)
 
 
*** I would kindly like to comment on the Nature Paper, the Lancet reply, and the newspaper articles.
 
snip...see full text ;
 
 
Subject: 1992 IN CONFIDENCE TRANSMISSION OF ALZHEIMER TYPE PLAQUES TO PRIMATES POSSIBILITY ON A TRANSMISSIBLE PRION REMAINS OPEN
 
BSE101/1 0136
 
IN CONFIDENCE
 
CMO
 
From: . Dr J S Metiers DCMO
 
4 November 1992
 
TRANSMISSION OF ALZHEIMER TYPE PLAQUES TO PRIMATES
 
1. Thank you for showing me Diana Dunstan's letter. I am glad that MRC have recognised the public sensitivity of these findings and intend to report them in their proper context. 'This hopefully will avoid misunderstanding and possible distortion by the media to portray the results as having more greater significance than the findings so far justify.
 
2. Using a highly unusual route of transmission (intra-cerebral injection) the researchers have demonstrated the transmission of a pathological process from two cases one of severe Alzheimer's disease the other of Gerstmann-Straussler disease to marmosets. However they have not demonstrated the transmission of either clinical condition as the "animals were behaving normally when killed". As the report emphasises the unanswered question is whether the disease condition would have revealed itself if the marmosets had lived longer. They are planning further research to see if the conditions, as opposed to the partial pathological process, is transmissible.
 
what are the implications for public health?
 
3. The route 'of transmission is very specific and in the natural state of things highly unusual. However it could be argued that the results reveal a potential risk, in that brain tissue from these two patients has been shown to transmit a pathological process. Should therefore brain tissue from such cases be regarded as potentially infective? Pathologists, morticians, neuro surgeons and those assisting at neuro surgical procedures and others coming into contact with "raw" human brain tissue could in theory be at risk. However, on a priori grounds given the highly specific route of transmission in these experiments that risk must be negligible if the usual precautions for handling brain tissue are observed.
 
1
 
92/11.4/1.1
 
BSE101/1 0137
 
4. The other dimension to consider is the public reaction. To some extent the GSS case demonstrates little more than the transmission of BSE to a pig by intra-cerebral injection. If other prion diseases can be transmitted in this way it is little surprise that some pathological findings observed in GSS were also transmissible to a marmoset. But the transmission of features of Alzheimer's pathology is a different matter, given the much greater frequency of this disease and raises the unanswered question whether some cases are the result of a transmissible prion. The only tenable public line will be that "more research is required’’ before that hypothesis could be evaluated. The possibility on a transmissible prion remains open. In the meantime MRC needs carefully to consider the range and sequence of studies needed to follow through from the preliminary observations in these two cases. Not a particularly comfortable message, but until we know more about the causation of Alzheimer's disease the total reassurance is not practical.
 
J S METTERS Room 509 Richmond House Pager No: 081-884 3344 Callsign: DOH 832 llllYc!eS 2 92/11.4/1.2
 
 
>>> The only tenable public line will be that "more research is required’’ <<<
 
>>> possibility on a transmissible prion remains open<<<
 
O.K., so it’s about 23 years later, so somebody please tell me, when is "more research is required’’ enough time for evaluation ?
 
Self-Propagative Replication of Ab Oligomers Suggests Potential Transmissibility in Alzheimer Disease
 
Received July 24, 2014; Accepted September 16, 2014; Published November 3, 2014
 
 
*** Singeltary comment PLoS ***
 
Alzheimer’s disease and Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy prion disease, Iatrogenic, what if ?
 
Posted by flounder on 05 Nov 2014 at 21:27 GMT
 
 
Terry S. Singeltary Sr.

No comments:

Post a Comment