Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Emerging Infectious Diseases (-$2.425 million) This request includes funds to focus on necessary activities for prion disease

 

 

 

A FOOLISH MOVE BY THE GOVERNMENT...TSS

 

 

 

2013

 

Emerging Infectious Diseases (-$2.425 million)

 

The FY 2013 budget request includes a decrease of $2.425 million for emerging infectious diseases below the FY 2012 level. This request includes funds to focus on necessary activities for prion disease and reflects a reduction due to a decrease in global public health risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Due to completion of population-based studies to address Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, the proposal also includes reduced funding that will shift focus of CDC’s activities to patient and provider education and clinic-based studies.

 

 

 


 

 

 

Sunday, June 23, 2013

 

National Animal Health Laboratory Network Reorganization Concept Paper (Document ID APHIS-2012-0105-0001)

 

Terry S. Singeltary Sr. submission

 


 

 

 

Thursday, June 20, 2013

 

atypical, BSE, CWD, Scrapie, Captive Farmed shooting pens (livestock), Wild Cervids, Rectal Mucosa Biopsy 2012 USAHA Proceedings, and CJD TSE prion Update

 


 

 

 

Thursday, June 13, 2013

 

Experimental interspecies transmission studies of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies to cattle: comparison to bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle

 


 

 

 

Monday, June 3, 2013

 

Unsuccessful oral transmission of scrapie from British sheep to cattle

 


 

 

 

Sunday, June 2, 2013

 

Characterisation of an Unusual TSE in a Goat by Transmission in Knock-in Transgenic Mice

 


 

 

 

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

 

Weld County Bi-Products dba Fort Morgan Pet Foods 6/1/12 significant deviations from requirements in FDA regulations that are intended to reduce the risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) within the United States

 


 

 

 

Thursday, June 6, 2013

 

BSE TSE PRION USDA FDA MAD COW FEED COMPLIANCE REPORT and NAI, OAI, and VAI ratings as at June 5, 2013

 


 

 

 

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

 

 

 

Atypical BSE in Cattle

 

 To date the OIE/WAHO assumes that the human and animal health standards set out in the BSE chapter for classical BSE (C-Type) applies to all forms of BSE which include the H-type and L-type atypical forms. This assumption is scientifically not completely justified and accumulating evidence suggests that this may in fact not be the case. Molecular characterization and the spatial distribution pattern of histopathologic lesions and immunohistochemistry (IHC) signals are used to identify and characterize atypical BSE. Both the L-type and H-type atypical cases display significant differences in the conformation and spatial accumulation of the disease associated prion protein (PrPSc) in brains of afflicted cattle. Transmission studies in bovine transgenic and wild type mouse models support that the atypical BSE types might be unique strains because they have different incubation times and lesion profiles when compared to C-type BSE.

 

 When L-type BSE was inoculated into ovine transgenic mice and Syrian hamster the resulting molecular fingerprint had changed, either in the first or a subsequent passage, from L-type into C-type BSE. In addition, non-human primates are specifically susceptible for atypical BSE as demonstrated by an approximately 50% shortened incubation time for L-type BSE as compared to C-type. Considering the current scientific information available, it cannot be assumed that these different BSE types pose the same human health risks as C-type BSE or that these risks are mitigated by the same protective measures.

 

 This study will contribute to a correct definition of specified risk material (SRM) in atypical BSE. The incumbent of this position will develop new and transfer existing, ultra-sensitive methods for the detection of atypical BSE in tissue of experimentally infected cattle.

 


 

 

 

*** The potential impact of prion diseases on human health was greatly magnified by the recognition that interspecies transfer of BSE to humans by beef ingestion resulted in vCJD. While changes in animal feed constituents and slaughter practices appear to have curtailed vCJD, there is concern that CWD of free-ranging deer and elk in the U.S. might also cross the species barrier. Thus, consuming venison could be a source of human prion disease. Whether BSE and CWD represent interspecies scrapie transfer or are newly arisen prion diseases is unknown. Therefore, the possibility of transmission of prion disease through other food animals cannot be ruled out. There is evidence that vCJD can be transmitted through blood transfusion. There is likely a pool of unknown size of asymptomatic individuals infected with vCJD, and there may be asymptomatic individuals infected with the CWD equivalent. These circumstances represent a potential threat to blood, blood products, and plasma supplies.

 

 

 


 

 

 

The chances of a person or domestic animal contracting CWD are “extremely remote,” Richards said. The possibility can’t be ruled out, however. “One could look at it like a game of chance,” he explained. “The odds (of infection) increase over time because of repeated exposure. That’s one of the downsides of having CWD in free-ranging herds: We’ve got this infectious agent out there that we can never say never to in terms of (infecting) people and domestic livestock.”

 


 

 

 

*** The discovery of previously unrecognized prion diseases in both humans and animals (i.e., Nor98 in small ruminants) demonstrates that the range of prion diseases might be wider than expected and raises crucial questions about the epidemiology and strain properties of these new forms. We are investigating this latter issue by molecular and biological comparison of VPSPr, GSS and Nor98.

 

 VARIABLY PROTEASE-SENSITVE PRIONOPATHY IS TRANSMISSIBLE ...price of prion poker goes up again $

 

 OR-10: Variably protease-sensitive prionopathy is transmissible in bank voles

 

 Romolo Nonno,1 Michele Di Bari,1 Laura Pirisinu,1 Claudia D’Agostino,1 Stefano Marcon,1 Geraldina Riccardi,1 Gabriele Vaccari,1 Piero Parchi,2 Wenquan Zou,3 Pierluigi Gambetti,3 Umberto Agrimi1 1Istituto Superiore di Sanità; Rome, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Scienze Neurologiche, Università di Bologna; Bologna, Italy; 3Case Western Reserve University; Cleveland, OH USA

 

 Background. Variably protease-sensitive prionopathy (VPSPr) is a recently described “sporadic”neurodegenerative disease involving prion protein aggregation, which has clinical similarities with non-Alzheimer dementias, such as fronto-temporal dementia. Currently, 30 cases of VPSPr have been reported in Europe and USA, of which 19 cases were homozygous for valine at codon 129 of the prion protein (VV), 8 were MV and 3 were MM. A distinctive feature of VPSPr is the electrophoretic pattern of PrPSc after digestion with proteinase K (PK). After PK-treatment, PrP from VPSPr forms a ladder-like electrophoretic pattern similar to that described in GSS cases. The clinical and pathological features of VPSPr raised the question of the correct classification of VPSPr among prion diseases or other forms of neurodegenerative disorders. Here we report preliminary data on the transmissibility and pathological features of VPSPr cases in bank voles.

 

 Materials and Methods. Seven VPSPr cases were inoculated in two genetic lines of bank voles, carrying either methionine or isoleucine at codon 109 of the prion protein (named BvM109 and BvI109, respectively). Among the VPSPr cases selected, 2 were VV at PrP codon 129, 3 were MV and 2 were MM. Clinical diagnosis in voles was confirmed by brain pathological assessment and western blot for PK-resistant PrPSc (PrPres) with mAbs SAF32, SAF84, 12B2 and 9A2.

 

 Results. To date, 2 VPSPr cases (1 MV and 1 MM) gave positive transmission in BvM109. Overall, 3 voles were positive with survival time between 290 and 588 d post inoculation (d.p.i.). All positive voles accumulated PrPres in the form of the typical PrP27–30, which was indistinguishable to that previously observed in BvM109 inoculated with sCJDMM1 cases.

 

 In BvI109, 3 VPSPr cases (2 VV and 1 MM) showed positive transmission until now. Overall, 5 voles were positive with survival time between 281 and 596 d.p.i.. In contrast to what observed in BvM109, all BvI109 showed a GSS-like PrPSc electrophoretic pattern, characterized by low molecular weight PrPres. These PrPres fragments were positive with mAb 9A2 and 12B2, while being negative with SAF32 and SAF84, suggesting that they are cleaved at both the C-terminus and the N-terminus. Second passages are in progress from these first successful transmissions.

 

 Conclusions. Preliminary results from transmission studies in bank voles strongly support the notion that VPSPr is a transmissible prion disease. Interestingly, VPSPr undergoes divergent evolution in the two genetic lines of voles, with sCJD-like features in BvM109 and GSS-like properties in BvI109.

 

 The discovery of previously unrecognized prion diseases in both humans and animals (i.e., Nor98 in small ruminants) demonstrates that the range of prion diseases might be wider than expected and raises crucial questions about the epidemiology and strain properties of these new forms. We are investigating this latter issue by molecular and biological comparison of VPSPr, GSS and Nor98.

 


 

 

 

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

 

VARIABLY PROTEASE-SENSITVE PRIONOPATHY IS TRANSMISSIBLE, price of prion poker goes up again $

 


 

 

 

 

 

CANADA SEE STEADY INCREASE OF THE SPORADIC CJD’S AND THE VPSPR’S (sporadic CJD’s). ...tss

 

 

 

PLEASE NOTE, type determination pending Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (tdpCJD) in Canada is also on a steady increase.

 

 please see ;

 

 

 

> 3. Final classification of 50 cases from 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012 is pending.

 

 CJD Deaths Reported by CJDSS1, 1994-20122

 

 As of May 31, 2012

 

 Deaths of Definite and Probable CJD

 

 Year Sporadic Iatrogenic Familial GSS FFI vCJD Total

 

 1994 2 0 0 1 0 0 3

 

 1995 3 0 0 0 0 0 3

 

 1996 13 0 0 0 0 0 13

 

 1997 16 0 1 1 0 0 18

 

 1998 22 1 0 1 0 0 24

 

 1999 26 2 2 1 0 0 31

 

 2000 32 0 0 3 0 0 35

 

 2001 27 0 2 1 0 0 30

 

 2002 31 0 2 2 0 1 36

 

 2003 27 1 1 0 0 0 29

 

 2004 42 0 1 0 0 0 43

 

 2005 42 0 0 2 0 0 44

 

 2006 39 0 1 3 1 0 44

 

 2007 35 0 0 4 0 0 39

 

 2008 48 0 1 0 0 0 49

 

 2009 48 0 3 2 0 0 53

 

 2010 34 0 3 0 0 0 37

 

 2011 37 0 2 1 0 1 41

 

 2012 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

 

 Total 525 4 19 22 1 2 573

 

 1. CJDSS began in 1998

 

 2. Data before 1998 are retrospective and partial, data from 1998 to 2008 are complete, and data for 2009 - 2012 are provisional

 

 3. Final classification of 50 cases from 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012 is pending.

 

 CJD Deaths Reported by CJDSS1, 1994-20122

 

 As of May 31, 2012

 


 


 

 

 

SEE DECEMBER 2012 CANADA

 


 

 

 

USA SEE STEADY INCREASE OF THE SPORADIC CJD’S AND THE VPSPR’S (sporadic CJD’s). ...tss

 

 National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center

 

 Cases Examined1

 

 (May 18, 2012)

 

 Year Total Referrals2 Prion Disease Sporadic Familial Iatrogenic vCJD

 

 1996 & earlier 50 32 28 4 0 0

 

 1997 114 68 59 9 0 0

 

 1998 88 52 44 7 1 0

 

 1999 123 74 65 8 1 0

 

 2000 145 103 89 14 0 0

 

 2001 210 120 110 10 0 0

 

 2002 248 149 125 22 2 0

 

 2003 266 168 137 31 0 0

 

 2004 326 187 164 22 0 13

 

 2005 344 194 157 36 1 0

 

 2006 382 196 166 28 0 24

 

 2007 377 213 185 28 0 0

 

 2008 396 232 206 26 0 0

 

 2009 423 256 212 43 1 0

 

 2010 413 257 216 41 0 0

 

 2011 410 257 213 43 0 0

 

 2012 153 82 51 15 0 0

 

 TOTAL 44685 26406 2227 387 6 3

 

 1 Listed based on the year of death or, if not available, on year of referral;

 

 2 Cases with suspected prion disease for which brain tissue and/or blood (in familial cases) were submitted;

 

 3 Disease acquired in the United Kingdom;

 

 4 Disease was acquired in the United Kingdom in one case and in Saudi Arabia in the other case;

 

 5 Includes 14 cases in which the diagnosis is pending, and 18 inconclusive cases;

 

 6 Includes 17 (16 from 2012) cases with type determination pending in which the diagnosis of vCJD has been excluded. The Sporadic cases include 16 cases of sporadic Fatal Insomnia (sFI) and 42 cases of Variably Protease-Sensitive Prionopathy (VPSPr) and 2118 cases of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD).

 

 

 

Rev 5/18/2012

 


 

 

 

> 6 Includes

 

 

 

> 17 (16 from 2012) cases with type determination pending in which the diagnosis of vCJD has been excluded.

 

 > The Sporadic cases include 16 cases of sporadic Fatal Insomnia (sFI) and 42 cases of Variably Protease-Sensitive Prionopathy (VPSPr) and 2118 cases of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD).

 

 WELL, it seems the USA mad cow strains in humans classified as type determination pending tdpCJD, VPSPr, sFFI, and sCJD) have steadily increased over the years, and the same old song and dance continues with sporadic CJD cases $$$

 

 

 


 

 

 

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

 

Late-in-life surgery associated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a methodological outline for evidence-based guidance

 


 

 

 

 TSS
 

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